How To Increase Your Klout Score [PART 2]

with 16 Comments

High Score

Answering the question “How do I increase my Klout score?” serves as a great opportunity to explain the value of the service Klout offers. Let’s defer to Klout founder and CEO Joe Fernandez for the secret sauce of raising one’s Klout score online.

“Create good content, and be consistent and your score will go up,” said Fernandez when I asked him how he replies to the most common question Klout receives.

Klout gets people calling in to ask for this very advice on a regular basis. From celebrity PR teams to businesses getting ready to send their first tweet. Many people are obsessing over their Klout scores and how to make sure they maintain “influence”. That word influence is where I think most people are getting tripped up.

My good friend Peter Shankman put it really well at his Christmas party a couple months ago, an event where Klout was a cosponsor and a portion of the guest list was determined by Klout scores. He responded to those calling the move “elitest” in good style.

“Klout is not about a number or influence, it is about identifying people that are passionate about a topic,” Shankman said.

That description gets to the heart of what Klout’s real power is. Klout can help businesses trying to increase their word of mouth. They do this by using math to find who is consistently talking about interesting things. And they define interesting by how that person’s connections react to what they say.

Klout suggests, that if you really want to increase your Klout score that you:

  1. Create good content
  2. Share it consitently

Sounds like familiar advice right? They are not inventing anything new here. But if it takes hearing it from Klout to convince you these are the best steps for building better relationships online, then I am ok with that.

If this article did not answer the question well enough for you, please refer back to Part 1.

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Image source: Flickr

16 Responses

  1. Jim Mitchem
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    Yup. Just be, and don’t keep score. Like always.

  2. jakrose
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    Simple right? Obvious and all, but still needs to be said for quite a few.

  3. Josh Davis
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    I don’t disagree with any of your advice. Really, if you just do social media right, your Klout score will go up.nnIf you only look at Klout scores from people you know personally, the system can look fairly accurate. It has its flaws, but it generally does a good job of showing activity and connections.nnBut if you look outside your personal network, that is when you start to see major flaws. There are millions of auto posting accounts that have no real human interaction, but use technology to post content, RT and follow. Hundreds of thousands of these accounts have 50+ Klout scores and many have achieved 60+ just following as many people as possible and churning through accounts that don’t follow back.nnBottom line is that Klout has potential. But if you use just that score to evaluate accounts, you are usually not getting a meaningful metric that should be the basis as anything but a starting point, if even that.n

  4. jakrose
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    Where are these numbers coming from?rnrnI think most people can easily judge if an account is a real person or a botrnof some sort. If people are using Klout as a metric, you are right, itrnshould just be a piece of the puzzle.

  5. Josh Davis
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    Jason-nnThe numbers I cite are just estimates. I have research Klout heavily and have never seen any definitive numbers in this area. I have a number of clients who are really into Klout scores so over a week, I see thousands of accounts that fit my description of auto posters, follows, etc. I think my estimated numbers are actually low, but they are just estimates.nnI would rather have a follower with a 30 Klout score who has follower/following numbers less than 500, than a 60 Klout score with 30K/30K numbers. Some of those massive follow/follower accounts are real people, but many aren’t. And either way, good luck trying to get any of their attention or interaction from them.nnI guess my point is automated massive follow/follower accounts by nature generally have 50+ Klout scores (40 is absolute minimum), but are generally worthless in terms of a follow. Klout isn’t to blame for that, but they don’t filter that into the score in a meaningful way.

  6. Josh Davis
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    Jason-nnThe numbers I cite are just estimates. I have research Klout heavily and have never seen any definitive numbers in this area. I have a number of clients who are really into Klout scores so over a week, I see thousands of accounts that fit my description of auto posters, follows, etc. I think my estimated numbers are actually low, but they are just estimates.nnI would rather have a follower with a 30 Klout score who has follower/following numbers less than 500, than a 60 Klout score with 30K/30K numbers. Some of those massive follow/follower accounts are real people, but many aren’t. And either way, good luck trying to get any of their attention or interaction from them.nnI guess my point is automated massive follow/follower accounts by nature generally have 50+ Klout scores (40 is absolute minimum), but are generally worthless in terms of a follow. Klout isn’t to blame for that, but they don’t filter that into the score in a meaningful way.

  7. jakrose
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    Keep in mind that even the most automated Twitter account can still haverninfluence. If people are following it and retweeting it, that is generatingrnaction.rnrnThat being said, of course these offer little value or no value forrnmarketers. And I think Klout is slowly accounting for that. When they rollrnout their new design this month, hopefully their better Topics focus will bernfull functional. I think that is where the real power is. Being able to seernwho is getting reactions from talking about Soccer or Diabetes or Cooking,rnetc.

  8. Sed6erz
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    Interesting post – as long as people bear in mind that this is “just” a score and use it as a tool Klout can be a real asset to find the right people. Enjoyed part 1 as well but did not comment.nI will follow the blog from now on. Thanks!

  9. jakrose
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    Agreed. Thanks for chiming in and sticking around.

  10. Josh Davis
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    Good discussion. If nothing else the prominence of Klout has raised the profile of influence metrics and got discussions like this going.nnI have seen them make continual improvement in scores, and I too am excited about new design. I hope they can make Topic focused information more usable.nnFrom viewing client accounts, I realized that there are so many automated tricks (many unintentional) that keep these automated mass follow/follower accounts going in terms of Klout. They feed on each other and spread their influence to each other with automated @ messages and RTs that no one really sees but automated software. I am not sure that they really are doing much influence outside of their own automated communities.nnThat said, they haven’t seemed to harm Twitter’s ability to continue to be worthwhile to legitimate users and brands. So if there is some learning curve on getting their influence scores figured out, I am fine with it.nnThanks again for the article.n

  11. Gregory Shumchenia
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    I agree with both steps completely. But it’s funny when you think about how Klout just created a rating system, based on good theory, and now it’s what all lots of people are concerned about. Like they’re creating good content just to raise their Klout score. Whatever happened to selfless engagement?

  12. jakrose
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    I would say there is no such thing as selfless engagement. At the end of thernday we all want something. The best we can hope for is positive andrngenerous engagement. Which is pretty damn good.rnrnKlout is not the first to do this. There are numbers attached to usrneverywhere. From net worth to credit score to age, and then online we havernwebsite uniques, pagerank, RSS readers, Twitter followers, etc. It goes onrnand on. Klout made the bold move of defining a very specific and emotionalrnthing for most people, influence. In many people’s mind that equals worth.rnSelf worth is a touchy subject and rightfully so. That being said, manyrnpeople dismiss Klout because of bad assumptions or put too much weight onrnthe score as a self worth measurement.rnrnI think people will figure it all out, especially as Klout adjusts to theirrnaudience and provides a better experience. They have a big update coming outrnthis month.

  13. Gregory Shumchenia
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    I can see what you mean about positive and generous engagement. Obviously at the end of the day, everyone needs to make a living, but a lot of the advice or help I give are to people that I’m positive will never become my clients or give me a cent. nnWell said about influence and self worth though, completely agree. I’m also curious to see what types of changes Klout is planning.

  14. jakrose
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    Yeah, when I say nothing is self serving I am really taking things into arnphilosophical discussion. You are doing it right.rnrnI just mean, we all do things for some reward. Seeing someone else smile canrnbe that reward. That makes US feel good. Whether it is karma, gettingrninto heaven, or being know as a “nice person” there is always something wernare after. There is nothing wrong with that. The real focus, as I said, isrnto be positive and generous.rnrnThanks for stopping by and commenting.

  15. Gregory Shumchenia
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    Philosophical. Touche again, sir.

  16. Lara
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    I would think that it would be even more helpful to spellcheckn”2. Share it consitently”u00a0 CONSISTANTLY