How I Filter The Noise, Beth Harte

with 9 Comments

beth-harteBeth Harte is a marketer, blogger, speaker, communicator, thinker, connector (people & dots), adjunct professor and Community Manager for MarketingProfs. Beth’s blog, The Harte of Marketing is featured in AdAge’s Power 150. Beth also blogs for MarketingProfs Daily Fix blog.

How We FilterThe more you engage in social media, the more you realize that there are a lot of folks out there talking just to talk and that there are some folks that aren’t as well known, but are absolutely brilliant. Of course, brilliant is a highly subjective term. For me brilliance isn’t someone who’s like Einstein. For me a brilliant person is the one who has a unique voice, isn’t a lemming, questions the status quo, always tries to spark a conversation (no matter how small or large) with an insightful post, tweet or comment, and someone I learn something new or different from.

So, how do I cut through the clutter to find these brilliant people?

Tweetdeck

When dealing with Twitter, I like to use Tweetdeck because it allows me to create groups…lots of groups! I create groups of friends, people who tweet on certain topics, keywords – you name it!
The more I can slice and dice (I am a marketer, after all), the more I can find those brilliant people and nuggets of information that they might be sharing.

BackType

beth-backtypeBackType is a cool site that allows you to keep track of your comments, people who have commented about you and, more importantly, the comments that people you follow leave for others. BackType also allows you to search on keywords, again, very helpful to a marketer. The best part about BackType is I can see where the people I follow leave comments, which helps me to find blogs or smart folks that I may not have known about.

Google Reader

I’d be lost without my Google Reader. Every time I find a new blog using the tools above, I add it to my Google Reader. You can imagine that over time, I have a TON of blogs bookmarked. Every morning, I change the reader to the “All Items” view and I scroll down all the posts, not by blogger…but by date. Those with the best or intriguing titles win my attention. Again, I also look for posts on topics, people’s names, and information I might not have had access to previously.

These tools might seem basic, and perhaps not so cool, but for a marketer, they relieve a lot of the time burden that social media places on us.

SERIES How I Filter the Noise – Jason Keath, Taylor Davidson, Beth Harte, Hermione Way, Wayne Sutton
  • Ok, ok, I am going to go sign up for backtype. I have avoided it for too long, but too many smart people seem to be using it. Plus the concept is sound.

    I follow the content of smart people and comments are definitely content. Quality content at that for many folks. I imagine you could even find some things out about a person's personality or certain interests you did not know about before.

    Thanks again for your take on this subject Beth.

  • Definitely: @Backtype is simply too powerful not to use. Following people starts with following what they create, what they share, what they read and what they comment on, each with it's own incentives, signals, benefits and costs for the creator and the follower; Backtype is simply the best solution I've seen for tracking people and keywords through comments.

  • life gives us exactly what we need at the exact moment we need it when we are in alignment with ourselves … this is the only real filter, and is impeccable … perhaps we can say that spiritual development practices are the only long-term noise filters …

  • For non-bloggers, I have just released a jQuery mashup with BackType and twitter to display tweets linking to your webpage directly onto it.

    http://www.raygun.org/backtweets/

  • Yep I agree with Taylor, Jason. So…have you signed up? What do you think? ;-)

  • I did sign up. Already using it a little. Definitely seems useful. Going to try it out in my morning regimen and see how it takes.

  • Yes, he has :)

  • Geez…nothing like peer pressure, eh? ;-)

  • It really does put a community around commenting. I like that. Brings
    more emphasis to the give and take we all would like to see more of on
    blog comments.

    jak (currently in Chicago at http://blogher.com – back in the CLT on
    Sunday)

    sent from my iPhone